The Cooper Institute
 

Founded in 1970 by the "Father of Aerobics"
Kenneth H. Cooper MD, MPH

 
 
 
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Wednesday, Jun 05, 2019

Men’s Health Month: Improving cardiorespiratory fitness reduces heart failure mortality

June is Men’s Health Month, which is a great opportunity to raise awareness about the importance of preventive health care for men. Heart failure is a common cause of illness and death in older adults. A study by The Cooper Institute shows that improving cardiorespiratory fitness reduces heart failure mortality in men....

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Wednesday, May 29, 2019

The 1975 Elite Runners Study: How Are Elite Distance Runners Different From the Rest of Us?

May is National Runners Month, so what better time to dust off one of our favorite studies on elite long-distance runners? This 1975 study was the first of its kind, helping us better understand how these incredible athletes differ from the rest of us mere mortals....

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Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Being Physically Fit can Help Decrease Risk of Premature Death in Men with Emotional Distress

An estimated 20 million Americans have symptoms of major depressive disorder, a known risk factor for heart disease and death. Can physical fitness help decrease the risk of premature death for people with depressive disorders?...

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Friday, May 03, 2019

Gluten: Facts and Fallacies

Diet trends may come and go, but there are some basic facts about nutrition that never change no matter how the general population interprets them. Take gluten for example. Many people are going to great lengths to avoid gluten in their diets with food manufacturers and some restaurants touting their ‘gluten-free’ products as part of a healthy lifestyle....

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Wednesday, Apr 03, 2019

Is High-fructose Corn Syrup Really any Worse Than any Other Simple Sugar?

Is High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) really more dangerous than other types of sugar? Does it cause obesity? Read on to learn the truth about added sugars in our diet....

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Thursday, Feb 28, 2019

Does a family history of chronic disease keep you from being active?

Having a family history of conditions like heart disease, cancer, or diabetes typically means having a significant risk of developing these serious health issues. Learn more about how increasing physical activity helps to decrease the risk....

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Friday, Feb 08, 2019

Physical Activity: Can you get too much of a Good Thing?

Is too much exercise dangerous? Study shows that extreme exercise does not increase risk of death from heart disease...

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Wednesday, Jan 23, 2019

The Truth About the Keto Diet

Hip and trendy diets are a dime a dozen, promising rapid weight loss and better overall health. But many, like the Ketogenic Diet, are more hype than health. Learn more about the keto diet and why it doesn’t hold its weight in a crowded weight-loss market....

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Wednesday, Jan 09, 2019

Fit or Fad: Diet Ratings for New Year’s Resolutions

The new year is always a great chance to set new goals for ourselves – especially when it comes to living a healthier life. With all the diet options available, do you know which ones measure up and which ones flop?...

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Friday, Nov 16, 2018

New Update to Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

The 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans is out now. Learn more about the new recommendations, what has changed, and how to live a healthier life....

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Monday, Sep 17, 2018

How to Separate Reputable Health, Fitness, and Nutrition Information from Myth and Hype

It’s easy to be overwhelmed or confused by the vast amount of information on health, fitness and nutrition - much of it with claims seem too good to be true. So how can you tell between fact and fiction, between sound science and marketing hype? Read more to learn how to objectively evaluate the validity of various sources of health information....

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Wednesday, Aug 29, 2018

Is There an Association Between Low Vitamin D Levels and Depression? The Cooper Center Longitudinal Study

Low serum vitamin D (SVD) levels are associated with numerous medical conditions, including neurologic disorders. In a joint study by The Cooper Institute and The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, researchers examined the association between SVD levels and depression. Read on to learn more....

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